LUCREZIA ALCORN IS A CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHER WHO APPROACHES HER SUBJECT MATTER WITH A TRADITIONALIST EYE.

PHOTOGRAPHING IN BLACKANDWHITE FILM AND DIGITAL,

ALCORN’S PORTRAITS EXPRESS A POWERFUL,

YET INTIMATE WINDOW INTO THE PORTRAYAL

OF THE FIGURE.

ALCORN’S CURRENT EXHIBIT  "SIGHT SEEN" IS ON VIEW AT 30 W. 15TH ST.

 

  

 

interview by Jay Miriam


Angelina of Maven Management (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


 

JAY MIRIAM: Your photographs expose the individual strength of your subjects — and in turn the composition is very direct and authentic —

How do you know life when you see it?

 

LUCREZIA ALCORN: I think life is always there, but the desire to be seen must be, as well. Allowing someone to photograph you requires a kind of open-hearted fragility which is born of a quiet strength and willingness to be seen.

 

JM: Are the shadows in your photographs anonymous?

 

LA: Quantum mechanics tells us that light behaves simultaneously as a particle or a wave. The multiple personality of light is referred to as “wave-particular duality.” Light behaves as a wave, or as particles, depending on what we do with it, and what we try to observe. In this way,

  

 

"Light is the ultimate subject— ever-changing, and illusive."

  

 

Light and dark simultaneously. Mysterious? Yes. Anonymous? I think not! The shadows have a lot of personality.

 

JM: If you could be born in any century or decade, which, and why?

 

LA: Haha, very tough going back in time as a woman, don’t you think?! But based solely on aesthetic proclivities I would say the following, in no particular order:

- 15th Century Florence, my place of birth, and the period during which my name originated (Italian Rinascimento).

- 17th Century Holland during the Dutch Golden Age.

- The Welsh coastline or Shetland Islands in the 1940s and 50s.

 

  


 

ASH of JAG Models (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


 

JM: What have you recently forgotten?

  

LA: Ha! Not enough—studying the self to forget the self.

  


ASH of JAG Models (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN 


  

JM: What is your poison?

 

LA: As of late? Mezcal on the rocks. Red wine, always.

  

JM: If you had to characterize your photographs in one word, what would it be?

 

LA: Disarming.

     


Shelda (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


  

JM: Where do you go for moments of solitude?

  

LA: I go to the ocean, or to the countryside when I’m able. Being on the water or in the woods is inspiring, humbling, reinvigorating, but not always possible. Living in NYC necessitates finding stillness, silence, quietude within, so I meditate.

 

  


Toni of FOLIO MONTREAL

(C) IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


  

JM: What was your first camera?

 

LA: My dad’s Canon AE-1, which his father (my grandfather) gifted him in 1980. I learned how to shoot film in high school on that camera, and still use it to this day—it continues to be my go-to 35mm SLR. I have a nostalgic attachment to it because both my grandfather and father took beautiful photographs of my mother while she was pregnant with me on that camera. It’s also the camera that my father used to document my entire childhood. There’s something really special about using a camera that was beloved by them, and has quite literally “seen” me and my sister through the entirety of our lives.

  

  


LUDOVICA LUDOVICA

(C) IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


 

  

JM: Does the imagination exist on the fringe, or does it reside in the home?

  

LA: It is my belief that imagination resides within every being and is not the preserve of the “genius”.

  

JM: During what time of the day do you most prefer to photograph?

 

LA: At dawn and dusk during the blue hour, which is the very short time between night and sunrise, or day and sunset.

  

“Blue,” says the writer Rebecca Solnit, “is the color of solitude and of desire. Blue is the color of longing for distances you never arrive in, for the blue of the world.”

  

  

for more on the photographer, visit her website at www.lucreziaalcorn.com

LUCREZIA ALCORN IS A CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHER WHO APPROACHES HER SUBJECT MATTER WITH A TRADITIONALIST EYE.

PHOTOGRAPHING IN BLACKANDWHITE FILM AND DIGITAL,

ALCORN’S PORTRAITS EXPRESS A POWERFUL,

YET INTIMATE WINDOW INTO THE PORTRAYAL

OF THE FIGURE.

ALCORN’S CURRENT EXHIBIT  "SIGHT SEEN" IS ON VIEW AT 30 W. 15TH ST.

 

  

 

interview by Jay Miriam


Angelina of Maven Management (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


 

JAY MIRIAM: Your photographs expose the individual strength of your subjects — and in turn the composition is very direct and authentic —

How do you know life when you see it?

 

LUCREZIA ALCORN: I think life is always there, but the desire to be seen must be, as well. Allowing someone to photograph you requires a kind of open-hearted fragility which is born of a quiet strength and willingness to be seen.

 

JM: Are the shadows in your photographs anonymous?

 

LA: Quantum mechanics tells us that light behaves simultaneously as a particle or a wave. The multiple personality of light is referred to as “wave-particular duality.” Light behaves as a wave, or as particles, depending on what we do with it, and what we try to observe. In this way,

  

 

"Light is the ultimate subject— ever-changing, and illusive."

  

 

Light and dark simultaneously. Mysterious? Yes. Anonymous? I think not! The shadows have a lot of personality.

 

JM: If you could be born in any century or decade, which, and why?

 

LA: Haha, very tough going back in time as a woman, don’t you think?! But based solely on aesthetic proclivities I would say the following, in no particular order:

- 15th Century Florence, my place of birth, and the period during which my name originated (Italian Rinascimento).

- 17th Century Holland during the Dutch Golden Age.

- The Welsh coastline or Shetland Islands in the 1940s and 50s.

 

  


 

ASH of JAG Models (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


 

JM: What have you recently forgotten?

  

LA: Ha! Not enough—studying the self to forget the self.

  


ASH of JAG Models (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN 


  

JM: What is your poison?

 

LA: As of late? Mezcal on the rocks. Red wine, always.

  

JM: If you had to characterize your photographs in one word, what would it be?

 

LA: Disarming.

     


Shelda (C)

IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


  

JM: Where do you go for moments of solitude?

  

LA: I go to the ocean, or to the countryside when I’m able. Being on the water or in the woods is inspiring, humbling, reinvigorating, but not always possible. Living in NYC necessitates finding stillness, silence, quietude within, so I meditate.

 

  


Toni of FOLIO MONTREAL

(C) IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


  

JM: What was your first camera?

 

LA: My dad’s Canon AE-1, which his father (my grandfather) gifted him in 1980. I learned how to shoot film in high school on that camera, and still use it to this day—it continues to be my go-to 35mm SLR. I have a nostalgic attachment to it because both my grandfather and father took beautiful photographs of my mother while she was pregnant with me on that camera. It’s also the camera that my father used to document my entire childhood. There’s something really special about using a camera that was beloved by them, and has quite literally “seen” me and my sister through the entirety of our lives.

  

  


LUDOVICA LUDOVICA

(C) IMAGE COURTESY OF LUCREZIA ALCORN


 

  

JM: Does the imagination exist on the fringe, or does it reside in the home?

  

LA: It is my belief that imagination resides within every being and is not the preserve of the “genius”.

  

JM: During what time of the day do you most prefer to photograph?

 

LA: At dawn and dusk during the blue hour, which is the very short time between night and sunrise, or day and sunset.

  

“Blue,” says the writer Rebecca Solnit, “is the color of solitude and of desire. Blue is the color of longing for distances you never arrive in, for the blue of the world.”

  

  

for more on the photographer, visit her website at www.lucreziaalcorn.com