q’s and portrait by Beata Kanter


1/3


 

 

Beata Kanter: Mock up a quick drawing of your dream residence.

 

Rebekah Campbell:

 

BK: So cozy and welcoming... I love it.

You’ve traveled quite a bit. Which country has influenced your creative expression the most?

 

RC: I only spent a short amount of time in Thailand when I was younger, but it really spoke to me even as a pair of young eyes looking in. Connecting to color and space and the way that translates to a still or moving image even, mimics things in my work. I am always under the impression that the space that you are at in life is always going to influence the work you make, so right now New York, even in its most masochistic way, touches me.

 

BK: If you had to spend the next 48 hours listening to one album, which would you choose?

 

RC: Harumi by Harumi. It’s a zombie-esque 1968 record that’s unknown... like an endless summer jaunt.

 

BK: Write down a synopsis of the last dream you remember -- one that you saw in vivid color.

 

RC: It was early morning and very blue outside; my mattress was floating. It seemed to be on water but it wasn’t wet. I walked down the hallway of my apartment into the kitchen. Every single photo booth strip on my refrigerator was gone. In real life we have around 40 I think. I started crying. A man in a green suit walked out of the bathroom and gave me white roses.

 

  


2/3


 

  

BK: If I handed you the keys to a canary – yellow Oldsmobile, where would you take it?

 

RC: I would drive to Maine, I want to visit the coast. It’s so gorgeous... cliffs, lighthouses... I think it would make me feel like I was in Twin Peaks.

 

BK: In your work, subjects gaze at the camera as if transfixed – wide eyed and mesmerized. Describe the process of achieving such an intimacy with complete strangers.

 

RC: It’s a difficult concept to put into words, but it’s a strange transcendental connection that you have to find. Looking at someone through a little box but still feeling like it’s not protruding into the space - teetering on this fine line of showing someone who they are.

I like Sontag’s quote,

“All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.”   

 

  


3/3


 

 

  

BK: Where and how do you spend a lazy Monday? Go through the whole day from morning till night.

 

RC: I wake up relatively early, make coffee and a bougie breakfast with my roommates. Walk across the bridge into Manhattan and go to the Whitney - write down my thoughts in my notebook. Meander to a cafe for a late lunch. Talk. Watch a movie in the evening. I more so think this has turned into my wish for a day to find new ideas! Ha.

 

BK: That sounds like a magical day.

Draw a self - portrait without looking in the mirror. Now look in the mirror. How’d you do?

 

RC:

 

You tell me.

 

BK: This is certainly thought provoking but I would argue that you’re much more beautiful in real life.

What is the first step in your process? And the last?

 

RC: I close my eyes and imagine what I need to create. The last step is letting that come to fruition.

 

BK: Letting that come to fruition? What does that mean exactly?

 

RC: That is for me to do and for others to find out ;).

 

 

for more on the photographer, visit her website at www.rebekahcampbell.net  

 

 

 

 

 

 

q’s and portrait by Beata Kanter


1/3


 

 

Beata Kanter: Mock up a quick drawing of your dream residence.

 

Rebekah Campbell:

 

BK: So cozy and welcoming... I love it.

You’ve traveled quite a bit. Which country has influenced your creative expression the most?

 

RC: I only spent a short amount of time in Thailand when I was younger, but it really spoke to me even as a pair of young eyes looking in. Connecting to color and space and the way that translates to a still or moving image even, mimics things in my work. I am always under the impression that the space that you are at in life is always going to influence the work you make, so right now New York, even in its most masochistic way, touches me.

 

BK: If you had to spend the next 48 hours listening to one album, which would you choose?

 

RC: Harumi by Harumi. It’s a zombie-esque 1968 record that’s unknown... like an endless summer jaunt.

 

BK: Write down a synopsis of the last dream you remember -- one that you saw in vivid color.

 

RC: It was early morning and very blue outside; my mattress was floating. It seemed to be on water but it wasn’t wet. I walked down the hallway of my apartment into the kitchen. Every single photo booth strip on my refrigerator was gone. In real life we have around 40 I think. I started crying. A man in a green suit walked out of the bathroom and gave me white roses.

 

  


2/3


 

  

BK: If I handed you the keys to a canary – yellow Oldsmobile, where would you take it?

 

RC: I would drive to Maine, I want to visit the coast. It’s so gorgeous... cliffs, lighthouses... I think it would make me feel like I was in Twin Peaks.

 

BK: In your work, subjects gaze at the camera as if transfixed – wide eyed and mesmerized. Describe the process of achieving such an intimacy with complete strangers.

 

RC: It’s a difficult concept to put into words, but it’s a strange transcendental connection that you have to find. Looking at someone through a little box but still feeling like it’s not protruding into the space - teetering on this fine line of showing someone who they are.

I like Sontag’s quote,

“All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.”   

 

  


3/3


 

 

  

BK: Where and how do you spend a lazy Monday? Go through the whole day from morning till night.

 

RC: I wake up relatively early, make coffee and a bougie breakfast with my roommates. Walk across the bridge into Manhattan and go to the Whitney - write down my thoughts in my notebook. Meander to a cafe for a late lunch. Talk. Watch a movie in the evening. I more so think this has turned into my wish for a day to find new ideas! Ha.

 

BK: That sounds like a magical day.

Draw a self - portrait without looking in the mirror. Now look in the mirror. How’d you do?

 

RC:

 

You tell me.

 

BK: This is certainly thought provoking but I would argue that you’re much more beautiful in real life.

What is the first step in your process? And the last?

 

RC: I close my eyes and imagine what I need to create. The last step is letting that come to fruition.

 

BK: Letting that come to fruition? What does that mean exactly?

 

RC: That is for me to do and for others to find out ;).

 

 

for more on the photographer, visit her website at www.rebekahcampbell.net