interview by Jay Miriam

portrait by Chris Olszewski


1/1


 

 

Jay Miriam: If a genie granted you 3 wishes, what would you wish for? 

 

Anna Bloda: If the gold fish came out to see me? 

 

JM: Yes..

 

AB: $10k coming monthly to my account. Just like that. Man of my life who would be in love with me to the end of my life and maybe, a little baby. 

 

JM: That’s a very modest three wishes…

 

AB: Yeah, I don’t know. what do you need in life? Love. Health. Health is the most important thing. Nothing else really comes to mind. 

 

JM: How often do you fall in love?

 

AB:                                          

 

 

 

“I fall in love . . .  almost . . . after . .  . every fuck.”

 

 

 

JM: Do you carry the love for that person forever?

 

AB: Mmm, no. It’s not a real love. It’s a temporary love. Real love is a longer process which requires a lot more acceptance. To accept mistakes, imperfections, compromise, to not disturb each other, to be separate and together. . . . it’s a long process. Falling in love takes steps and you must do these steps. 

 

 


 

Sita Abellan photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // bullett magazine


 

 

 

 

JM: Did you ever hitchhike? 

 

AB: When I was a teenager, but it’s not my style. I like to have everything planned. And I’m afraid that . . . you could get kidnapped. Yeah, not my style. 

 

JM: How has your taste and artistic vision evolved since first moving to New York five years ago?

 

AB: Spending time with the youth culture in New York helped me to unravel my style.  It influenced my perception, the way I look with my eyes. Instagram has also been created in the last 5 years and this mosaic of visual information, watching the photos of strangers, is a relaxation for my mind. But also inspiration. 

 

 

 

 


Lady Fag photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // Vaga Magazine


 

JM: You went to a traditional art school in Poland, right…

 

AB: Yes. I studied painting, and drawing, in addition to photography. We had books, not instagram. I have a traditional base.

 

 

“I have to be careful not to be a dinosaur.”

 

 

 

 

Classical education is important but New York’s youth culture pushed me to go deeper. To shoot now. To see what is now. 

 

JM: What do you think is the best way to see a photograph? 

 

AB: Do you mean technically?

 

JM: No not really, I don’t know, is there a good way and a bad way to look at a photograph?

 

AB: This is a very difficult question. One second. 

 

JM: You don’t have to answer. 

 

AB: With a fresh eye. 

 

JM: Is there someone dead or alive you’d like to photograph?

 

AB: In this case, I can meet someone who is completely unknown, and on the street, and this is the person I’d like to photograph. There is a moment of inspiration — and passion. 

 

JM: So no one specifically . . . ?

 

AB: There are people, for sure, who are known. For instance, I’d love to photograph India Salvor Menuez. 

 

JM: Any reason in particular? 

 

AB: Yes, I like to photograph artists, performers -- people with creative spirits. This way, during the shoot it is more of a give and take; an interaction. They respond to me and I respond to them. 

 

JM: And so, this connection forms.

 

AB: Exactly.

 

 

 


ATL Twins photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // Chrome Magazine

 

 

 

ATL Twins photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // Chrome Magazine


 

 

 

 

JM: Is there a way you like to connect with your models?

 

AB: Yes. I’ll tell you a quick story. Five years ago, I was photographing a model from Jamaica. She was young. The first thing she did when she saw me was squeeze me, you know, a hug. But really long and loving. I was in shock. In Poland, you don’t do something like this. There’s no “Hi, how are you? I love you. Let’s hug”. I wasn’t used to it. But the energy was so good, I realized how much it changed the connection. 

 

JM: It made the introduction less formal, in a way. . . 

 

AB: Yes.

 

 

 

“It’s good to approach a photoshoot as if you are on a playground.”

 

 

 

I like to be silly before the shoot begins and get to know the model. This way she feels comfortable with me and knows that it’s ok to show your personality. To be goofy. To make mistakes. To be confident. To experiment.

 

JM: Sillyness.

 

AB: Powaga to jest killer.

 

JM: Powaga?

 

AB: Seriousness. 

 


Labanna Babylon photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // S Magazine


             

JM: Ha! So, how far in advance do you like to plan? 

 

AB: Usually 3 days in advance. Sometimes, when someone texts me spontaneously, "Hey, let’s get lunch!", it’s hard because I have so many things to do and my schedule is too busy for something like that. 

 

JM: Do you have a favorite photographer?

 

AB: I don’t really have a favorite photographer. There are so many. Thousands I could say, each day a new chick pops out of an egg there is a new and talented photographer born. No one person...no.

 

JM: This is a confusing question, I’m not even sure how to ask it, but what is the point of calling things real, or unreal? 

 

AB: This is very interesting. I’m not sure, I don’t know if I can tell you. But I will tell you there are times when I spend a few days with a boy and it feels so real. But then you realize, no that was bullshit. Not real. . .  but did you mean more so, aesthetically? 

 

JM: Could be, or not. Anything really. 

 

AB: Ha, ok. I think if something is real, you know. You get shaken. 

 

JM: Are dreams real? 

 

AB: Dreams? Yeah, this is amazing. Oh my god. Sometimes I wish to stay in this un-realness so long. When I wake up, I’m like fuck it, it’s alluring, this dream-life. 

 

JM: But dreams aren’t real.

 

AB: Well, Buddhists say that realness is what is there. Who is to say our reality isn’t someone else’s dream, or our dream isn’t a window into an alternative world? Like we’re switching. 

 

JM: Oh, I love this song. “Que Sera, Sera”. My grandfather would sing it to my mother who would sing it to me. 

 

AB: Really? In Polish or in English?

 

JM: In English. My grandfather didn’t speak English but he knew the lines of the song. I don’t think there’s a Polish version. Anyway, do you have a risk you’d like to take?

 

AB: Yes, all the time.

 

 

 

“Who doesn’t risk doesn’t drink champagne.”

 

 

I risk with everything, but it doesn’t feel like a risk, in day to day it comes down to being brave. To know what you want and to not be afraid to work for it. Oh Jay, I have to leave soon. I have a date.

 

JM: Amazing — ok, last Q: What is your favorite thing to look at? 

 

AB: My face. 

 

JM: Thank you, Anna. 

 

 

                                                                                                      for more on the artist, visit her webiste at www.annabloda.com

 

 

 

interview by Jay Miriam

portrait by Chris Olszewski


1/1


 

 

Jay Miriam: If a genie granted you 3 wishes, what would you wish for? 

 

Anna Bloda: If the gold fish came out to see me? 

 

JM: Yes..

 

AB: $10k coming monthly to my account. Just like that. Man of my life who would be in love with me to the end of my life and maybe, a little baby. 

 

JM: That’s a very modest three wishes…

 

AB: Yeah, I don’t know. what do you need in life? Love. Health. Health is the most important thing. Nothing else really comes to mind. 

 

JM: How often do you fall in love?

 

AB:                                          

 

 

 

“I fall in love . . .  almost . . . after . .  . every fuck.”

 

 

 

JM: Do you carry the love for that person forever?

 

AB: Mmm, no. It’s not a real love. It’s a temporary love. Real love is a longer process which requires a lot more acceptance. To accept mistakes, imperfections, compromise, to not disturb each other, to be separate and together. . . . it’s a long process. Falling in love takes steps and you must do these steps. 

 

 


 

Sita Abellan photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // bullett magazine


 

 

 

 

JM: Did you ever hitchhike? 

 

AB: When I was a teenager, but it’s not my style. I like to have everything planned. And I’m afraid that . . . you could get kidnapped. Yeah, not my style. 

 

JM: How has your taste and artistic vision evolved since first moving to New York five years ago?

 

AB: Spending time with the youth culture in New York helped me to unravel my style.  It influenced my perception, the way I look with my eyes. Instagram has also been created in the last 5 years and this mosaic of visual information, watching the photos of strangers, is a relaxation for my mind. But also inspiration. 

 

 

 

 


Lady Fag photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // Vaga Magazine


 

JM: You went to a traditional art school in Poland, right…

 

AB: Yes. I studied painting, and drawing, in addition to photography. We had books, not instagram. I have a traditional base.

 

 

“I have to be careful not to be a dinosaur.”

 

 

 

 

Classical education is important but New York’s youth culture pushed me to go deeper. To shoot now. To see what is now. 

 

JM: What do you think is the best way to see a photograph? 

 

AB: Do you mean technically?

 

JM: No not really, I don’t know, is there a good way and a bad way to look at a photograph?

 

AB: This is a very difficult question. One second. 

 

JM: You don’t have to answer. 

 

AB: With a fresh eye. 

 

JM: Is there someone dead or alive you’d like to photograph?

 

AB: In this case, I can meet someone who is completely unknown, and on the street, and this is the person I’d like to photograph. There is a moment of inspiration — and passion. 

 

JM: So no one specifically . . . ?

 

AB: There are people, for sure, who are known. For instance, I’d love to photograph India Salvor Menuez. 

 

JM: Any reason in particular? 

 

AB: Yes, I like to photograph artists, performers -- people with creative spirits. This way, during the shoot it is more of a give and take; an interaction. They respond to me and I respond to them. 

 

JM: And so, this connection forms.

 

AB: Exactly.

 

 

 


ATL Twins photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // Chrome Magazine

 

 

 

ATL Twins photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // Chrome Magazine


 

 

 

 

JM: Is there a way you like to connect with your models?

 

AB: Yes. I’ll tell you a quick story. Five years ago, I was photographing a model from Jamaica. She was young. The first thing she did when she saw me was squeeze me, you know, a hug. But really long and loving. I was in shock. In Poland, you don’t do something like this. There’s no “Hi, how are you? I love you. Let’s hug”. I wasn’t used to it. But the energy was so good, I realized how much it changed the connection. 

 

JM: It made the introduction less formal, in a way. . . 

 

AB: Yes.

 

 

 

“It’s good to approach a photoshoot as if you are on a playground.”

 

 

 

I like to be silly before the shoot begins and get to know the model. This way she feels comfortable with me and knows that it’s ok to show your personality. To be goofy. To make mistakes. To be confident. To experiment.

 

JM: Sillyness.

 

AB: Powaga to jest killer.

 

JM: Powaga?

 

AB: Seriousness. 

 


Labanna Babylon photographed by Anna Bloda

(c) // S Magazine


             

JM: Ha! So, how far in advance do you like to plan? 

 

AB: Usually 3 days in advance. Sometimes, when someone texts me spontaneously, "Hey, let’s get lunch!", it’s hard because I have so many things to do and my schedule is too busy for something like that. 

 

JM: Do you have a favorite photographer?

 

AB: I don’t really have a favorite photographer. There are so many. Thousands I could say, each day a new chick pops out of an egg there is a new and talented photographer born. No one person...no.

 

JM: This is a confusing question, I’m not even sure how to ask it, but what is the point of calling things real, or unreal? 

 

AB: This is very interesting. I’m not sure, I don’t know if I can tell you. But I will tell you there are times when I spend a few days with a boy and it feels so real. But then you realize, no that was bullshit. Not real. . .  but did you mean more so, aesthetically? 

 

JM: Could be, or not. Anything really. 

 

AB: Ha, ok. I think if something is real, you know. You get shaken. 

 

JM: Are dreams real? 

 

AB: Dreams? Yeah, this is amazing. Oh my god. Sometimes I wish to stay in this un-realness so long. When I wake up, I’m like fuck it, it’s alluring, this dream-life. 

 

JM: But dreams aren’t real.

 

AB: Well, Buddhists say that realness is what is there. Who is to say our reality isn’t someone else’s dream, or our dream isn’t a window into an alternative world? Like we’re switching. 

 

JM: Oh, I love this song. “Que Sera, Sera”. My grandfather would sing it to my mother who would sing it to me. 

 

AB: Really? In Polish or in English?

 

JM: In English. My grandfather didn’t speak English but he knew the lines of the song. I don’t think there’s a Polish version. Anyway, do you have a risk you’d like to take?

 

AB: Yes, all the time.

 

 

 

“Who doesn’t risk doesn’t drink champagne.”

 

 

I risk with everything, but it doesn’t feel like a risk, in day to day it comes down to being brave. To know what you want and to not be afraid to work for it. Oh Jay, I have to leave soon. I have a date.

 

JM: Amazing — ok, last Q: What is your favorite thing to look at? 

 

AB: My face. 

 

JM: Thank you, Anna. 

 

 

                                                                                                      for more on the artist, visit her webiste at www.annabloda.com